Office for the Aging

 
Updated May 27, 2016, 12:44 PM

Programs

Caregiver Resource Centers (CRC) (Caregiver Assistance Program)

Description of Program: Section 206 of the NYS Elder Law, Article II, Title I established the Caregiver Assistance Program within the NY State Office for the Aging. Under this program, the State Office for the Aging is authorized to establish training and assistance programs for caregivers of frail and disabled persons. Since its inception in the late 1980’s, NYS has provided $20,000 annually to 17 area agencies on aging (AAAs) for local Caregiver Resource Centers (CRCs) to provide caregivers with information, assistance and counseling, support groups and training as well as initiatives including specialized training curricula for caregivers of developmentally disabled adults, minority populations, and caregivers of grandchildren. (In 2008, in response to the budget crisis, the annual allocation to AAAs was reduced to $19,611.) With the advent of the federal Title III-E funded Elder Caregiver Support Program in 2001, CRC AAAs have coordinated their CRC programs with their Title III-E programs so that, from the caregiver perspective, there is a program consisting of a coordinated array of services that are comprehensive, complementary, and supplemental in nature.

CRCs are in the following counties: Broome, Cattaraugus, Clinton, Cortland, Fulton, Genesee, Madison, Monroe, Nassau, Onondaga, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Steuben, Sullivan, Tompkins, and Westchester.

Goals and Objectives

  • To provide a single focal point of assistance to family members and other informal caregivers ·
  • To provide training, support groups, counseling and technical assistance to caregivers so they may continue in their caregiving roles
  •  To link caregivers with AAA and other community-based services

Eligibility: Family and other informal caregivers of a frail and/or disabled elderly individual.

Funding: State-funded program; $20,000 each county ($360,000 total). In 2008, responding to the budget crisis, the allocation to each county was reduced to $19,611.

Services Levels: During SFY 2007-08, CRCs trained 6,117 individuals, served 708 individuals in 49 different support groups, counseled 403 individuals, and provided 10,833 units of information and referral services.

Laws, Regulations and Standards: Section 206 of the NYS Elder Law, Article II, Title I

Forms: Caregiver Client Profile, Annual Report Form

Calendar of Events: NYSOFA holds monthly conference calls with AAA Caregiver Coordinators and others (2nd Thursday of each month, 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.)

Supporting Materials: Section 206 of the NYS Elder Law, Article II, Title I

 

Community Services for the Elderly

Program Snapshot: Description of Program: The Community Services for the Elderly program provides community-based, supportive services to frail, low-income elderly who need assistance to maintain their independence at home. CSE has effectively been a state block grant that enables localities to determine specific unmet needs and shape the way the delivery system is organized to respond, giving them considerable flexibility within the general parameters of the program’s intent and goals. The local planning and priority setting process has resulted in development of a wide range of community services including: transportation and outreach; case management; in-home services; home delivered meals; adult day care; respite; housing-related programs; personal emergency response systems (PERS); and health promotion services.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Enable the elderly to remaining their homes and participate in family and community life;
  • Reduce the reliance on institutional care;
  • Provide cost-effective, non-medical services;
  • Enable access to necessary information and support; promote the continued involvement of informal caregivers.

Eligibility:

  • Must be 60 or older;
  • Program targeted to individuals who are disabled, those living alone and those over 75 years of age;
  • Those who receive home delivered meals, homemaker/personal care, house-keeper/chore services and adult day care must be assessed as functionally impaired and in need of these community-based long term care services.

Funding:  In SFY 1999-2000, the CSE appropriation was $13.87 million. With these funds AAAs provided:

  • Over 635,000 rides to the frail elderly for medical appointments or other services;
  • Over 108,000 hours of case management;
  • Over 176,000 hours of homemaker and housekeeping services;
  • Almost 487,000 hours of adult day care;
  • Over 578,000 home delivered meals.

Laws, Regulations and Standards:

Supporting Materials

Expanded In-home Services for the Elderly (EISEP)

Program Snapshot: The New York State funded Expanded In-home Services for the Elderly Program (EISEP) enables many frail older adults to remain in their homes. The program provides a well-planned, coordinated package of in-home and other supportive services designed to supplement informal care. Regulatory changes in 2009 allowed for the inclusion of consumer directed services within EISEP.  NYSOFA has developed technical assistance resources related to the planning, development and implementation of consumer directed programming under EISEP.  These resources are available on this page, under "Consumer Direction resources."

The goal of EISEP is to improve access to cost effective, non-medical in-home services and supports for non-Medicaid older adults who have functional impairments in the area of their activities of daily living.  These in-home supports could include: housecleaning, cooking, shopping, dressing, bathing, or assistance with transferring in/out of bed/chair. The program also enhances the ability of family members or other informal caregivers to care for an older person in a home environment and can also provide non-institutional respite supports to for caregivers to allow them a temporary relieve form the responsibilities of caregiving.  Case management is also provided to help older persons and their families assess their needs and develop, implement and maintain an appropriate plan of services and service delivery.  Option to purchase or rent equipment and goods are also available through EISEP to maintain or promote an individual's independence; maintain, repair or modify an individual's home so that it is a safe and adequate living environment; and, to address everyday tasks.

Laws, Regulations and Standards: Elder Law:

Elder Law

Elder Law click link and follow instructions below
On this page, the last hyperlink at the bottom is "Laws of New York".  The visitor will click on that hyperlink.  
On the next page, the visitor will click on the hyperlink "ELD" Elder Law  
The next page brings the visitor to the Articles and Titles of the Elder Law.  The visitor would then click on the hyperlink for the Article or Title that he/she wants to view.  By clicking on the Title 1, the visitor can then view each section of the Elder Law.  
If the visitor is interested in viewing the Laws that govern EPIC, they would click on Title 3.

Official Compliation of Codes, Rules & Regulations of the State Office for the Aging
State regulations have been adopted to provide program guidance to area agencies on aging The regulations define and describe programs and establish rules for delivery AAA directors should be familiar with the regulations. The regulations serve as a reference guide and should be the first place to look when you have programmatic questions.

NYSOFA Regulations click link and follow instructions below
Once the Visitor clicks on the above link, they should then click on TITLE 9 - EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT.
The visitor should then click on the "expansion box" in front of Subtitle Y New York State Office for the Aging.  
By clicking on the "expansion box", it brings the visitor to the Chapters of NYSOFA's regulations.  The visitor would then click the "expansion box" to view the Parts inside of each chapter.  
By clicking the "expansion box" in front of each Part, the visitor can then view the sections contained in each part.  
To view a particular section, the visitor would click the hyperlink for the section that the visitor would like to view. 

Goals and Objectives:

  • Improve access to and availability of appropriate and cost-effective non-medical support services for functionally-impaired, non-Medicaid elderly.
  • Enhance the ability of family members or other informal caregivers to care for an older person in a home environment.
  • Improve the planning, accessibility and management of home care services at the community and client levels.
  • Expand the availability of non-medical home care services as a cost-effective alternative to more intensive and costly forms of care.
Core Services Provided under EISEP: 
  • Case Management – To help older persons and their families assess their needs and develop, implement and maintain an appropriate plan of services and service delivery. It brings order to the confusing array of services and benefits that are needed and available in a community to assist individuals in need of long term care.
  • In-home Services -- Consisting of personal care level I and personal care level II. Personal care level I provides assistance with instrumental activities of daily living, e.g., housecleaning, cooking, shopping. Personal care level II provides assistance with both instrumental activities of daily living and activities of daily living, e.g., dressing, bathing, transferring in/out of bed/chair. 
  • Non-Institutional Respite -- To temporarily relieve the client's primary informal caregiver from the stresses and strains associated with caregiving. Types of respite include companion service and social adult day care.
  • Ancillary Services -- A flexible category of non-medical services, items/goods and other supports which together with other assistance are intended to provide an individual in need of long term care with the ability to remain safely in the community with an acceptable quality of life. Options are available to maintain or promote an individual's independence; maintain, repair or modify an individual's home so that it is a safe and adequate living environment; and, to address everyday tasks.
EISEP Eligibility: To be eligible for the program a person must be: 
  • At least 60 years old; 
  • Impaired in an "Activity of Daily Living" (such as eating, dressing, bathing or toileting), or in two "Instrumental Activities of Daily Living" (such as meal preparation, housekeeping or shopping); 
  • In need of assistance;
  • Able to be maintained safely at home; and
  • Not be a Medicaid recipient. The person who appears to be eligible for Medicaid must be willing to apply for Medicaid. EISEP can only serve this person temporarily while the Medicaid application is being processed.

Consumer Directed Eligibility: In addition to the traditional EISEP eligibility criteria, CDIS under EISEP eligibility requirements include:

  •  Be capable of making choices regarding their activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living and the type, quality and management of their in-home services worker:
  • Understand the impact of these choices; and
  • Assume responsibility for the results of these choices.

    OR
  • The person must be capable of delegating authority to another who can carry out the activities noted above on their behalf and meets the requirements of the consumer representative;
  • If the person is not able to delegate this authority, has someone who can carry out the activities noted above who meets the requirements of the consumer representative and that person is either the legally appointed guardian or conservator; or has been previously designated by the consumer as their representive in matters related to coordinating their care and they are currently doing so and are willing to continue to do so; or is currently involved in the person's life, has a strong personal commitment to them and demonstrates knowledge of the consumer's preferences.

EISEP Funding Allocations:   
12-PI-19 SFY 2012-13 Enacted Budget Final Allocations for CSE, EISEP,CSI,SNAP,CRC,State Transportation,HIICAP and Information on Local Assistance Funding in the 2012-13 State Budget.
12-PI-02 New 2012 Medicaid (MA) Resource Levels Within EISEP and CSE 

Tehnical Assistance and Resources:
Services: This section provides resources related to EISEP Provider rates and services.
13-IM-02 2012 MA Personal Care Rates EISEP Home Care Rates MA Rates Does Not Inlcude R&R
MA Rates Includes R&R

NYS Level I and II Personal Care Aide Functions and Tasks-Scope of Practice

Case Management: This section provides the requriements for case managers and provides tehnical assistance related to case management

Assessment: This section provides information required to conducting financial and functional assessments and determin cost share.

Care Planning: This section provides resources on effective care planning.

Reporting: This section provides guidance on EISEP reporting requirements.

Discharge: This section outlines the discharge process and provides technical assistance on consumer rights related to hearings.

Consumer Direction: This section consists of a consumer directed manual used when developing consumer direction into EISEP.  It contains other relevant training materials and useful resources. 12-TAM-02  Consumer Directed In-home Services Under EISEP and CSE

Frequently Asked Questions: This section provides a Questions and Answer (Q/A) document (organized by topic) that consolidated all previous iterations of EISEP Q/A into one easy to use reference.  

Home Care Services:  "NYS Level I and II Personal Care Aide Functions and Tasks--Scope of Practice

COMPASS 2014 – A webinar to assist case managers with asking Questions about Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity. This webinar was provided on Friday April 12, 2013, Monday April 15, 2013 and Wednesday May 15, 2013 by staff from NYSOFA, SAGE and others. Included is the Q and A, "NYSOFA Webinars for Case Managers". To see the questions and answers from the three webinars click here, Q & A. To play the webinar click here, Webinar.

NYSOFA Learning Center provides educational and reference resources to AAA staff to help navigate through the various statutory, regulatory and policy requirements for administration of 15 or more federal and state aid grant programs.

Foster Grandparents Program

Program Snapshot:

Description of Program: The Foster Grandparent Program (FGP) is a program for older adults (55+) who wish to work with children in their community.  FGP provides an opportunity to serve as mentors, tutors, and caregivers for children and youth with special needs.  Foster Grandparents provide anywhere from 15 to 40 hours of weekly service to community organizations such as Head Start, hospitals, public schools, day care centers, and juvenile detention centers where they provide support to special needs children aged birth to 21 years.

Goals and Objectives: The program is designed to provide meaningful volunteer roles for older adults.  Foster Grandparents offer emotional support to children who have been abused and neglected, mentor troubled teenagers and young mothers, and care for premature infants and children with physical challenges.  In the process, they strengthen communities by providing caring services that community budgets are unable to financially support and by nurturing a bond across generations.

Eligibility: To become a Foster Grandparent you must be age 55 or over and be able to serve between 15 and 40 hours per week.  Volunteers who meet certain income guidelines also receive a small, tax-free stipend.

Funding: NYSOFA receives $98,000 in state funds to support 15 programs across the state.  Programs are selected through a national competitive process run by the Corporation for National and Community Service.  To find out about funding opportunities visit: https://www.nationalservice.gov/build-your-capacity/grants/funding-opportunities

Funding Source: State and federally funded.  Federal funding is through the Corporation for National and Community Service.

For more information please contact the Aging Foster Grandparent Staff.

The documents provided below are for use by staff of FGP programs funded by New York State.

Required Reporting Forms
2016-17 FGP Annual Report (Word)
2017-18 FGP Wellness Survey (Word)(PDF)

Final Allocation Schedule for April 1, 2017 – March 31, 2018 (PDF)

Grantee Prequalification Requirements:
Not-for-profit grantees receiving FGP grants in excess of $5,000 must register and prequalify in the NYS Grants Gateway. For more information, visit https://grantsreform.ny.gov/Grantees

Master Contract for Grants documents:
These documents are to be used by grantees receiving $10,000 or more in state funds.

Grant Provisions
NYS Master Contract for Grants
Attachment A-1 – Program Specific Terms and Conditions

Required Forms that must be submitted to NYSOFA
Contact Information Form(Word)(PDF)
Attachment B-1 – Budget (Excel)
Attachment C – Program Work Plan (Word)
FGP Summary of Changes for State Fiscal Year 2017-18 (Word)
Minority and Women-owned Business Enterprises Required Forms

Purchase Order documents:
These documents are used to by grantees receiving less than $10,000 in state funds.

Grant Provisions
State of New York Letter of Agreement (PDF)
Grant Policy Memorandum Lobbying and Fundraising Activities (PDF)
Grant Policy Memorandum Non-Sectarian Activities (PDF)

Required Forms that must be submitted to NYSOFA
Contact Information Form (Word)(PDF)
Agency Certification (Word)(PDF)
FGP Summary of Changes for State Fiscal Year 2017-18 (Word)

Claiming Procedure and Forms for Purchase Orders

Claiming Procedure (PDF)
Claim for Payment (PDF)
Final Accounting Statement (Excel)

Health Indicators

With the transformation of the health care delivery system, the role of providers who serve older adults is changing to include promoting healthy aging, helping older adults better manage chronic conditions, and demonstrating the difference they are making in the health and wellbeing of the clients they serve.  Providers will need to work differently; Health Indicators is a tool to help them do just that.

By using Health Indicators, providers will be able to:

  • Collect information about the health risks of the clients they serve;
  • Analyze the data and plan and implement services or programs to address the most prevalent risks;
  • Use a registry to target the planned services and programs to those clients who would benefit from them;
  • Track the progress they are making; and
  • Measure their results.
NYSOFA offers a variety of easy to use tools and step-by-step processes to guide organizations on the implementation of Health Indicators.  For more detailed information on Health Indicators visit https://aging.ny.gov/healthindicators/

Naturally Occurring Retirement Community (NORC)

Program Snapshot:

Description of Program: Classic and neighborhood NORC programs, collectively known as the NORC program, coordinate a broad range of health and social services to help support older residents to age in their own homes and they utilize the strength of the older residents in the design, implementation, and prioritization of services and activities. The intent of the NORC program is to facilitate and integrate the health and social services already available in the community, as well as organize those necessary to help meet the goal of enabling older adults to remain at home.

NORC programs operate through multi-disciplinary partnerships and represent a mix of public and private entities and provide on-site services and activities. At the core of each partnership are social service and health care providers; housing managers or representatives of neighborhood associations; and, most important, the community’s residents, especially its older residents. These core partners connect to many other stakeholders in a community – typically, local businesses; civic, religious, and cultural institutions; public and private funders; and local police and other public safety agencies. By harnessing these resources for a common interest, NORC programs help to transform the community into a good place in which to grow old.

For more detailed information about NORCs visit aging.ny.gov/norcblueprint/

Goals and Objectives: The overarching goal of a NORC program is to maximize the health of its community. NORC programs are proactive in their approach, seeking to expand and strengthen the connections older adults have in and to their communities before a crisis occurs.  A NORC program identifies strengths to be harnessed and they are positioned to design and implement a responsive program that integrates: community engagement (i.e. education programming, community action initiatives, and opportunities for older adults to take on new roles), social work services provided to individuals, caregivers, and groups of older adults and health care related services addressing both individual health management needs and the health of the community.

Eligibility: A person must be 60 or over and live within the catchment area of NORC.

In order for an area to qualify as a Classic NORC it must be an apartment building or housing complex which:

  • Was not predominantly built for older adults;
  • Does not restrict admissions solely to older adults;
  • At least forty percent of the units have an occupant who is an older adult; AND in which at least two hundred fifty of the residents of an apartment building are older adults or five hundred residents of a housing complex are older adults; and
  • A majority of the older adults to be served are low or moderate income, as defined by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development.

 
In order for an area to qualify as a Neighborhood NORC it must be a residential dwelling or group of residential dwellings in a geographically defined neighborhood or group of contiguous neighborhoods (the boundaries of which are clear and coherent and create an identifiable program) which:

  • Was not predominantly developed for older adults;
  • Does not predominantly restrict admission to older adults;
  • In a non-rural area*, has at least thirty percent of the residents who are older adults or the units have an occupant who is an older adult; or in a rural area**, has at least twenty percent of the residents who are older adults or the units have an occupant who is an older adult; and
  • Is made up of low-rise buildings six stories or less and/or single and/or multi-family homes without common ownership, provided, however, that apartment buildings and housing complexes may be included in rural areas.

*Non-rural areas is defined as any county, city, or town that has a population or population density greater than that which defines a rural area
**Rural area is defined as counties within the state having a population of less than two hundred thousand persons including the municipalities, individuals, institutions, communities, programs, and such other entities or resources as are found therein; or, in counties with a population density of less than one hundred and fifty persons per square mile including the villages, individuals, institutions, communities, programs, and such other entities or resources as are found therein.

Funding: There are two allocations of $2,027,500 in state funds for the NORC program; one for classic NORCs and one for neighborhood NORCs.  NYSOFA currently funds 16 classic NORCs and 13 neighborhood NORCs.

Laws, Regulations and Standards: Elder Law Section 209

For more information please contact the Aging NORC Program Staff.

The documents provided below are for use by staff of the NORC programs funded by New York State.

Contract Documents and Other Reference Materials
Final Allocation Schedule for July 1, 2017 - December 31, 2017 (PDF)

Grant Provisions
NYS Master Contract for Grants
Attachment A-1 Program Specific Terms and Conditions (PDF)
Attachment C - Program Work Plan (Word)
Attachment M - Participation by Minority Group Members and Women with Respect to State Contracts (PDF)

12-TAM-04 - NORC-SSP Program Guidance and Requirements (PDF)

Glossary of Terms (PDF)
Policy for Matching Funds Requirements (PDF)

Required Forms that must be submitted to NYSOFA:
Contact Information Form (Word) (PDF)
Attachment B - Budget (Excel)
If Applicable, Subcontractor Budget (Excel)
If Applicable, Request for Waiver of Matching Requirements (Word)
Service Detail Instrument (Word)

Minority and Women-owned Business Enterprises Required Forms

Required Reporting Forms
NORC Quarterly Service Report [Excel] [PDF]
NORC Annual Program Report - January - December Programs [Word] [PDF]
NORC Annual Program Report - July - June Programs [Word] [PDF]
NNORC Annual Program Report[Word] [PDF]
MWBE 102-Work Force Employment Utilization [Word] [PDF]
MWBE 105-Quarterly Report [Word] [PDF]

Claim Forms and Instructions
AC3253-S - Claim for Payment [Excel] [PDF]
Expenditure Report [Excel] [PDF]
Expenditure Report Supporting Schedule [Word] [PDF]
Equipment Inventory and Disposition Form [Excel] [PDF]
Vouchering Procedure [Word] [PDF]

Respite Program 

Last Updated  04/2010

Contacts: Erin Purcell, Aging Services Representative

Program Snapshot: Description of Program: Respite services provide infrequent and temporary substitute care or supervision of frail or disabled adults on behalf of and in the absence of the caregiver, for the purpose of providing caregivers with relief from the stress of caregiving and to help them maintain a normal life.  All local offices for the aging provide services for the purpose of respite. 

In addition to those services, the NYSOFA directly funds ten Respite Programs.  This includes eight community-based agencies and two local offices for the aging that serve thirty counties in New York State.

Goal and Objectives:

  • Provide caregivers with opportunities for relief of and support in their caregiving responsibilities;
  • Allow caregivers to address their own needs; and
  • Help caregivers maintain those they care for in the community and prevent or delay institutionalization.

 

The services provided under the Respite Program include:

  • Adult day services, including adult day health care (ADHC), social adult day services (SADS) and Alzheimer’s/Dementia specific day services;
  • In-home services, including personal care level II, personal care level I, friendly visitor/companion and home health aide services;
  • Overnight respite including a temporary stay in an adult care facility, nursing home or  other setting that includes spending the night;
  • Case management to help older people and their families assess their needs and develop, implement and maintain an appropriate plan of services and service delivery;
  • Information and assistance on community services including linkages and follow-up activities on referrals for services; and
  • Caregiver services including support groups, counseling, education and training programs to assist caregivers in sustaining their role in caring for frail or disabled adults.

 

Eligibility: To be eligible for the Respite Program a person must be caregiver.  This is a person who is a either a family member or other non-paid person who generally provides the care to or supervision of an adult who is frail and/or has disabilities, a care receiver.  The caregiver may or may not reside in the same household as care receiver.  The care receiver is an adult who is unable to attend to his or her daily needs without the assistance or regular supervision of a caregiver due to mental or physical impairment and who is otherwise eligible for services on the basis of his or her impairment.  Priority is given to adults who are frail and/or have disabilities who are sixty years of age or older.

Funding: local offices for the aging may use a variety of State funding, including EISEP and CSE and federal funding under the OAA, including Title III-E and Title III-B to provide respite services. 

The Respite Program is State funded. Funding for SFY 2009-10 was $1,207,120.

Services Levels:  In 2009-2010, 2,850 caregivers directly received 9,830 support service interventions that included counseling, case management and support groups.  Additionally, 950 of their care receivers received 35,400 care interventions that included adult day care, home care and overnight stays in nursing homes. 

Laws, Regulations and Standards: Elder Law Section 208     

Supporting Materials:

NYSOFA Respite Program Policy Memorandum on Respite Activities

NYSOFA Standard Definitions for Respite Program

Other:

The following 11 organizations receive a Respite Program grant from NYSOFA:

  • Alzheimer’s Association of Western New York (Serves the following counties: Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Niagara and Wyoming);
  • Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Albany (Serves the following counties:  Albany, Columbia, Delaware, Fulton, Greene, Herkimer, Montgomery, Otsego, Rensselaer, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Warren and Washington);
  • EAC, Inc (Serves Nassau County);
  • Home Aides of Central New York (Serves Onondaga County);
  • Jamaica Service Program for Older Adults (Serves Queens County);
  • Madison County Office for the Aging (Serves Madison County);
  • New York Foundation for Senior Citizens (Serves the following counties: Brooklyn and Manhattan); and
  • People (Serves Erie County)
  • Ridgewood Bushwick Senior Citizens Council (Serves Queens County)
  • Suffolk County Office for the Aging (Serves Suffolk County)

Any questions or issues regarding these documents should be directed to: New York State Office for the Aging at (518) 473-4808 or Aging NORC-SSP and NNORC Program Staff.

Required Reporting Forms
NORC Quarterly Service Report [Excel] [PDF]
NORC Annual Program Report - January - December Programs [Word] [PDF]
NORC Annual Program Report - July - June Programs [Word] [PDF]
NNORC Annual Program Report[Word] [PDF]
MWBE 102-Work Force Employment Utilization [Word] [PDF]
MWBE 105-Quarterly Report [Word] [PDF]

Claim Forms and Instructions
AC3253-S - Claim for Payment [Excel] [PDF]
Expenditure Report [Excel] [PDF]
Expenditure Report Supporting Schedule [Word] [PDF]
Equipment Inventory and Disposition Form [Excel] [PDF]
Vouchering Procedure [Word] [PDF]

Social Adult Day Services SADS

Last Updated: 04/2010

Contacts: Erin Purcell, Aging Services Representative

Program Snapshot: Description of Program: Social Adult Day Services is a structured, comprehensive program which provides functionally impaired adults (those who need help with everyday tasks) with an array of services in a protective setting for any part of the day, but for less than a 24 hour period. Each participant receives services in accordance with an individualized service plan that is based on an assessment of the individual.

The New York State Office for the Aging funds 18 programs directly. (See list under “Other” at the end of this description.) However, many local offices for the aging across NYS provide some funding for social adult day programs as well.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Delay or eliminate the need for the institutionalization of older adults who are frail and/or have disabilities;
  • Enhance the ability of family members or other informal caregivers to care for an older person in the community by providing respite for the caregiver;
  • Provide a safe, secure, enriching environment for older adults that are physically frail or have disabilities, have mild cognitive impairments (MCI) or have Alzheimer’s disease or other types of dementia;
  • Implement appropriate levels of purposeful activities and stimulation to promote positive participant outcomes including social communication (interpersonal relationships, peer interaction, friendships and humor), pleasure, creative expression, comfort, self-worth, utilization of capabilities, and physical, mental and psychosocial wellness;
  • Provide working caregivers with a community based option for the supervision and care of a loved one;
  • Maintain impaired older adults in non-institutional settings by providing a variety of services that promotes independence and informal supports; and
  • Be a viable option in the long term care continuum throughout New York State.

About social adult day services programs:  

  • Programs that receive funding from a local office for the aging and/or NYSOFA state funding are required to follow the NYSOFA regulations for social adult day care.  There is no license, registration or certification required by New York State to operate a social adult day program;
  • Services must include socialization (planned activities based on the needs and capabilities of the participants), monitoring and supervision (whereabouts of participants at all times, observing for behavioral and physical conditions), personal care (some assistance with mobility, toileting, transfers and eating) and nutrition (meals, snacks and hydration as appropriate and in accordance with NYSOFA or CACFP requirements);
  • Services may include total assistance in personal care (including continence and bathing assistance, assistance with self-administration of medication, simple dressings, routine skin care and assistance with adaptive equipment);
  • Optional services include maintenance and enhancement of daily living skills (assisting participants to learn or relearn self-care skills and instrumental activities of daily living), case assistance, caregiver services, transportation coordination, directly provided transportation, and other services as identified in the participant care plan; and
  • Specialty components that have been implemented in some funded programs include Alzheimer’s/dementia specialized care, bi-lingual programming, health monitoring and wellness classes, community integration, service opportunities, intergenerational programming, therapeutic physical movement (physical therapy, occupational therapy, yoga, Tai-Chi, drum circles), creative art therapies (music therapy, art therapy, literary/poetry and drama), reminiscence and remotivational avenues for expression and validation.

Eligibility: : A person who needs the assistance of another person in at least one of the following activities of daily living: toileting, mobility, transferring, or eating; or who needs supervision due to cognitive and/or psycho-social impairment.

Funding: Local offices for the aging use a variety of State funding streams, including EISEP and CSE, and federal funding under the OAA, including Title III-E and Title III-B to fund social adult day services.

For the 18 programs directly funded by NYSOFA State funding for SFY 2009-10 was $872,000. There is also a 25% match requirement from the grantee. These grantees were selected from a RFP process in 2000-2001 and continue to be funded.

Services Levels: In 2008-2009, 1,300 participants attended one of the 18 adult day programs funded under this grant. Reported outcomes include maintaining mental acuity and physical motor skills; decreased behavioral problems; and improved psychosocial functioning. Additionally 1,430 caregivers received services through these programs including respite, care coordination, support groups and long term care planning for their loved ones.

Laws, Regulations and Standards:
Elder Law Section 214 & NYSOFA Regulations Part 6654 .20

Supporting Materials:
94-PI-09 Newly Adopted Social Adult Day Care Regulations
95-TAM-05 Social Adult Day Care Monitoring Tool

Other:  The following 18 organizations receive a Social Adult Day Services grant from NYSOFA:

Alzheimer’s Association of Central New York (Syracuse)
Capital Region Geriatric Center-The Eddy (Renesselaer)
Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services (Flushing)
Chautauqua Adult Day Centers (Jamestown, Dunkirk Westfield)
Town of East Hampton (Long Island)
JASA (Bronx)
JASA (Nassau)
Kaleida Health Foundation (Buffalo)
Lenox Hill Neighborhood House (Manhattan)
Park Slope Geriatric (Brooklyn)
Queens Community House (Forest Hills)
Resource Center for Independent Living (Utica)
Riverstone Senior Life Services (Manhattan)
Putman County Office for the Aging
Senior Service Centers of Albany
Spanish Speaking Elderly Council (Brooklyn)
Sid Jacobson Jewish Community Center (East Hills, Long Island)
Ulster Home Care (Kingston)


NY Connects: Choices for Long Term Care

Last Updated:  August 2012

Contacts:  NYConnects


Fax Number: (518) 486-2225

WebEx Presentations
Main Concepts and features of the No Wrong Door Screen - July 31, 2015

January 2012 - The "County Data Book: Selected Characteristics (2011)" has been prepared by the New York State Office for the Aging in order to provide frequently requested information about selected demographic characteristics, including projections to the year 2040. The County Data Book provides state-level information and county-specific information for each county in New York. In addition, these data are developed statewide, so the opportunity exists to compare and contrast local areas with the entire state. These data may be used for a variety of purposes, which may include: ″ Budget planning, advocacy and community empowerment activities; ″ Service awareness, information, and outreach; and, ″ Partnership and coalition building.

Reporting Information
Reporting System: http://www.reporting.aging.ny.gov/
12-PI-01 NYConnects Reporting System Updates and Improvements(1/03/2012)

Program Information
NY Connects Program Overview   - 04/2008
Select Highlights 06/2008
NY Connects Talking Points 01/22/2008
NY Connects Program Functions 04/2008

Laws, Regulations and Standards
Fighting Life Settlements Fraud in the State of New York
NY Connects Program Standards provides guidance to local NY Connects programs on minimum program standards. 04/2008
07-PI-09 Long Term Care Ombudsman Program and Point of Entry Conflict
08-PI-18 LTCOP/NY Connects Conflict(August 14, 2008)
14-PI-16 NY Connects Choices for Long Term Care Revised Program Standards

Forms/Instructions
View available NY Connects forms such as Budget and Reporting Claiming form 3922.

Marketing Materials:
NY Connects Logo [PDF File]
NY Connects Statewide Brochure [PDF] 10/2013
NY Connects: June 2009 Newsletter;  March 2009 Newsletter;  November 2008 Newsletter

Technical Assistnce Resources By Topic

Resources by topic provides program materials developed to provide guidance in establishing local NY Connects programs.
NY Connects Program Satisfaction Survey

NY Connects Statewide Long Term Care Resource Directory
Resource Directory Inclusion Exclusion Policy for NY Connects: Choices for Long Term Care
Resource Directory User ID Request Form - September 2011
NY Connects Resource Directory Password Authorization Worksheet
NY Connects Listing Maintenance User Manual
11-PI-19 NY Connects Long Term Care Resource Directory Business Rules - Style Guide and FAQs Attachments:Attachment 1; Attachment 2; Attachment 3 

 

NYS Long Term Care Advisory Council
Minutes from the New York State Long Term Care Advisory Council meetings

NY Connects Technical Assistance Resource Long Term Care Council  04/2007

NYS Long Term Care Advisory Council
Combinded Advisory Council Mintues-October 29,2009
Upstate Advisory Council Minutes-October 29,2008
Downstate Advisory Council Minutes-October 30,2008
Upstate Advisory Council Minutes - March 11, 2008
Downstate Advisory Council Minutes - April 8, 2008 
Preliminary Report on Long Term Care Councils 03/2008
Membership List- Upstate 04/2008
Membership List- Downstate 04/2008

Upcoming Events
We encourage you to let your Long Term Care Coordinator know of any successful practices that you may have that can be shared with other counties. These resources are developed based on feedback from you and local requests for technical assistance. Please let us know of any additional topics that would be of use to you.

Wellness in Nutrition Program

Last Updated: 03/07

Program Snapshot: Description of Program: The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, created in 1984, provides nutritious meals and related services to the frail elderly at high nutritional risk. Working in concert with the Older Americans Act Title III-C Nutrition Program, SNAP expands the state’s capacity to serve the frail elderly in their homes. It is a key component of a package of home and community services necessary to meet the needs of New Yorkers. The State Fiscal Year 2013-2014 Executive Budget included a recommendation to re-name SNAP as Wellness in Nutrition, or WIN (SNAP is the new name for Food Stamps, which would create confusion with the aging network’s SNAP).

About this program:

  • Funded by formula to the 59 local Area Agencies on Aging throughout the state;
  • 87% of funding is used to provide home delivered meals;
  • remainder of funding provides services such as shopping assistance, congregate meals, nutrition counseling and nutrition education;
  • Targets low income, those who live alone and those over age 75.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Provide meals to frail elderly people who are at risk of malnutrition because they are no longer able to obtain adequate diet without assistance;
  • Assist the elderly to remain in their homes and to complement other community-based, long term care services;
  • Maintain or improve participants’ nutrition-related health;  

Eligibility:

  • Must be age 60 or older, incapacitated due to accident, illness or frailty; unable to prepare own food; and lacks informal support;
  • Must be assessed for need.

Retired Senior Volunteer Program RSVP

Program Snapshot:

Description of Program: The Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) is the largest older adult volunteer program in the nation.  RSVP recruits, trains, and places older adult volunteers (age 55+) in a host of community-based human service agencies.  Service opportunities are as diverse as the communities in which volunteers serve and include areas such as health promotion and wellness; assistance to frail and vulnerable older adults through home visiting, escort, transportation, and home-delivered meals as well as cross-generational efforts in tutoring and mentoring children.  RSVP volunteers choose how, where, and how they want to serve, with commitments ranging from a few hours to 40 hours per week.

Goals and Objectives: To promote older adults to remain involved in their community by using the skills and talents they have developed over the years, or developing new ones; and to increase their socialization and feeling of purpose.

Eligibility: RSVP volunteers must be age 55 or older.  RSVP volunteers are not paid any wage or stipend, but may receive reimbursement for certain out-of-pocket costs, such as transportation. 

Funding: NYSOFA receives $216,500 in state funds to support 33 programs across the state.  Programs are selected through a national competitive process run by the Corporation for National and Community Service.  To find out about funding opportunities visit: https://www.nationalservice.gov/build-your-capacity/grants/funding-opportunities

Funding Source: State and federally funded.  Federal funding is through the Corporation for National and Community Service.

For more information please contact the Aging RSVP Staff.

Required Reporting Forms
2016-17 RSVP Annual Report (Word)

Final Allocation Schedule for April 1, 2017 – March 31, 2018 (PDF)

Grantee Prequalification Requirements:
Not-for-profit grantees receiving RSVP grants in excess of $5,000 must register and prequalify in the NYS Grants Gateway. For more information, visit https://grantsreform.ny.gov/Grantees.

Purchase Order documents:

Grant Provisions
State of New York Letter of Agreement (PDF)
Grant Policy Memorandum Lobbying and Fundraising Activities (PDF)
Grant Policy Memorandum Non-Sectarian Activities (PDF)

Required Forms that must be submitted to NYSOFA
Contact Information Form (Word) (PDF)
Agency Certification (Word) (PDF)
RSVP Summary of Changes for State Fiscal Year 2017-18 (Word)

Claiming Procedure and Forms for Purchase Orders

Claiming Procedure (PDF)
Claim for Payment (PDF)
Final Accounting Statement (Excel)